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Three Versions of SuSE Linux Distros on HP Compaq nc4000 Notebook



Document version: 1.1



Author: Sergei Dubarev <mailto:sergei@scenosaurus.org>



DISCLAIMER


INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE INACCURATE. YOU'RE USING IT AT YOUR OWN RISK. IN NO CASE THE AUTHOR OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE RESPONSIBLE FOR PROBLEMS ARISING FROM USE OR MISUSE OF INFORMATION INCLUDED. ALL NAMES USED HEREIN ARE FOR IDENTIFICATION PURPOSES ONLY AND MAY BE THE TRADEMARKS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.



Note. This document is based on my previous article about SuSE Linux 9.0 and nc4000 notebook.



Changes Since Version 1.0


March 27, 2005 – Version 1.1


USB Hard Drive (4.19) and CardBus CF Adaptor sections (4.26) are updated with the information on how to disable subfs. Missing section about USB 2.0 CardBus (PCCard) adaptor (4.27) was added. Also, some small cosmetic changes in the article are made.


March 6, 2005 – Version 1.0


Initial document version.



Abstract


I do like small notebooks, so when time has come to replace my old machine, I've picked smaller 12” one from HP Compaq instead of anything else... Previously I owned a 8,9” Sony Vaio notebook. It was great in many of aspects; however, it was rather slow, and small sizes prevented me from working with it “on a full-time basis”. :) Basically, I've used it as a portable storage with wide screen. With nc4000, it is easier to work, and even to simulate real “big” desktop computer (http://yourdesktop.org/filez/tmp/desktop-simulation-2.jpg). :)


Below I have described my experience with three versions of SuSE Linux Professional distributions: 9.0, 9.1, and 9.2.



1 Quick Overview of nc 4000


This is the machine configuration that I've got from my local notebook dealer.


Hardware Configuration


CPU

Pentium M, with variable clock of 600 to 1500 MHz

RAM

512 MB

Video

ATI Radeon IGP 340M, with 32 MB of shared VRAM by default

Hard drive

40GB

CD/DVD drive

None

Extra things

Onboard modem, Gigabit Ethernet, CardBus slot, Secure Digital slot, two USB 2.0 ports, IRDA port, Wireless card, Bluetooth, VGA and S-Video output, microphone and headphone jacks



2 Installation


I have installed each version of SuSE Linux using USB CD/DVD drives. I have used Plextor USB CD-RW drive in order to install version 9.0, and Lite-On DVD+/-RW drive in an USB box for versions 9.1 and 9.2. I have edited boot sequence in BIOS setup of my notebook, and also enabled USB legacy support option. Note that CD-ROM drive boot option is not available in BIOS in case CD/DVD device is disconnected from a notebook, so please connect it first.

Version 9.1 was installed as an upgrade to an existing 9.0 one. With version 9.2, someting went wrong, and upgrade was not successful: installer just could not finish system configuration properly. So I have to install it from scratch. Please note that my failure does not mean that you will not be able to upgrade existing version 9.0 or 9.1 installation up to version 9.2.


My notebook came with Windows XP Pro installed on FAT32. So I have re-partitioned hard drive a bit in order to fit Linux there. Since I am not using NTFS, there was no trouble with re-partitioning at all, and pre-installed Windows XP survived. :) For partitioning, I have used SuSE Linux installer. Finally, I've got the following layout (please see below). I don't care if it is optimal or not; it is just OK for me. :) You may use your own one, of course.


Partitioning Layout


nc4000:~ # fdisk -l /dev/hda


Disk /dev/hda: 40.0 GB, 40007761920 bytes

240 heads, 63 sectors/track, 5168 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 15120 * 512 = 7741440 bytes


Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/hda1 * 1 994 7514608+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)

/dev/hda2 996 5168 31547880 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)

/dev/hda5 996 1550 4195768+ 83 Linux

/dev/hda6 1551 1828 2101648+ 83 Linux

/dev/hda7 1829 2383 4195768+ 83 Linux

/dev/hda8 2384 2453 529168+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris

/dev/hda9 2454 5168 20525368+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)



3 Hardware and Feature Support Tables for Misc. SuSE Linux Professional Distros


Before examining the tables themselves, please take a look at the legend of the symbols that are used in the tables. As you can see, each device or feature may be “working OK”, “working partially”, “not working”, and “not tested”. Sometimes a bit of magic is required to make things working. I have used symbols instead of words in order to indicate support status for different devices and features. Hope that my idea is quite easy for everyone to understand. :)


Legend


Symbol

Meaning

+

... is working quite OK

%

... is working partially

-

... is not working

?

... is not tested

m

... some magic is required



3.1 Support for Basic Features and Devices

The “Basics” table includes support summary for the things that are built into the nc4000 notebook.


Basics


Features/Distro Versions

9.0

9.1

9.2

Touchpad/Trackpoint

+

+

+

Special Keys (mute, wi-fi, etc.)

%

%

%

2D Acceleration

+

+

+

3D Acceleration

m

m

+

Dualhead

?

?

?

TV Output

?

?

?

External VGA Output

+

+

+

Sound

+

+

+

CardBus Slot

+

+

+

USB 2.0 Ports

+

+

+

SD Slot

?

?

-

Wired Gigabit Networking

+

+

+

Wireless Networking

+

?

+

Bluetooth

?

?

?

Built-in Modem

m

m

m

IRDA Port

?

?

?

APM

%

%

%

ACPI

%

%

%



3.2 Support for Extra Devices

The “Extras” table includes support summary for some extra devices that are/were used along with nc4000 notebook. There are no device names (i.e. trademarks) in it since they are described below in my comments.


Extras


Features/Distro Versions

9.0

9.1

9.2

USB Hard Drive

-

%

+

USB CD/DVD+/-RW Drive

+

+

%

USB Keyboard

?

?

+

USB Mouse

?

?

+

USB Printer

+

+

+

USB Card Reader

+

+

+

USB 4-Port Hub

+

+

+

CardBus CompactFlash Adaptor

+

+

m

CardBus USB 2.0 4-port Adaptor

+

+

+

Digital Camera

?

?

%

Printer Server

+

+

+



4 Detailed Description of Hardware and Feature Support in Misc. SuSE Linux Professional Distros



4.1 Touchpad/Trackpoint


This one started to work without any additional setup in all three versions of SuSE Linux (9.0, 9.1, and 9.2). Synaptics-specific features for touchpad were enabled as well. Just in case you're facing some troubles with setup, here is an excerpt from my /etc/X11/XF86Config (aka /etc/X11/xorg.conf on SuSE 9.2) file:


Section "InputDevice"

Identifier "Mouse[1]"

Driver "synaptics"

Option "Device" "/dev/psaux"

Option "Protocol" "auto-dev"

Option "LeftEdge" "1700"

Option "RightEdge" "5300"

Option "TopEdge" "1700"

Option "BottomEdge" "4200"

Option "FingerLow" "25"

Option "FingerHigh" "30"

Option "MaxTapTime" "180"

Option "MaxTapMove" "220"

Option "VertScrollDelta" "100"

Option "MinSpeed" "0.06"

Option "MaxSpeed" "0.12"

Option "AccelFactor" "0.0010"

Option "SHMConfig" "on"

# Option "Repeater" "/dev/ps2mouse"

EndSection


# ...


Section "ServerLayout"

Identifier "Layout[all]"

InputDevice "Keyboard[0]" "CoreKeyboard"

InputDevice "Mouse[1]" "CorePointer"

InputDevice "Mouse[2]"

Option "Clone" "off"

Option "Xinerama" "off"

Screen "Screen[0]"

EndSection


Note. Since I am using an USB mouse on SuSE 9.2 as well, there is the “Mouse[2]” entry in ServerLayout section. You may omit it if you have no USB mouse set up (please also see an appropriate chapter below).



4.2 Special Keys


I was not able to tune some of those under SuSE 9.0, and I haven't tried them on 9.1. It does not mean that you will fail with setup as well. It just means that I was not diligent enough. :)


This is what was working without setup from my side: brightness control (Fn+F9, Fn+F10), and Wireless button; external monitor switch (Fn+F4) was working only in console but not in X11.


On SuSE 9.2, I was able to turn on Volume Up (+) and Volume Down (-) buttons in addition to the ones mentioned above. First, I have created a ~/.Xmodmap file being logged in as an ordinary user:


sergei@nc4000:~> cat ~/.Xmodmap


keycode 174 = F16

keycode 176 = F17


This file contains mappings for two keys mentioned above. If you want to learn more keycodes, you may use the xev command under X11. When xev is launched, it is dumping mouse and keyboard events to xterm or Konsole window. At this moment, you may press the desired key and see its code on the screen:


KeyRelease event, serial 30, synthetic NO, window 0x3600001,

root 0x49, subw 0x0, time 13791289, (415,500), root:(416,550),

state 0x0, keycode 174 (keysym 0xffcd, F16), same_screen YES,

XLookupString gives 0 bytes:


Next step was to write some simple scripts, ~/bin/vol_up for Volume Up, and ~/bin/vol_dn for Volume Down, respectively:


sergei@nc4000:~> cat ~/bin/vol_up

#!/bin/bash


amixer -q sset PCM,0 10%+,10%+ unmute

amixer -q sset Headphone,0 10%+,10%+ unmute

amixer -q sset Master,0 10%+,10%+


sergei@nc4000:~> cat ~/bin/vol_dn

#!/bin/bash


amixer -q sset PCM,0 10%-,10%- unmute

amixer -q sset Headphone,0 10%-,10%- unmute

amixer -q sset Master,0 10%-,10%-


These scripts are required to control volume in headphones and speaker. Since I am rarely using speaker to play music, I have not added the “unmute” option into those scripts to the appropriate line, i.e. “Master”. I am only unmuting the speaker when it is really required.


When those scripts are ready, you may bind them to special keys. In order to avoid restart of X11, type from the xterm or Konsole session:


sergei@nc4000:~> xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap


In theory, this should make your keys known to X11 immediately. Please note that you will still need that .Xmodmap file under home directory in order to map them on a constant base.


Key binding procedure highly depends on your window manager. For KDE, you may use the KHotKeys program:


sergei@nc4000:~> khotkeys


First, you may create a new action group using the New Group button. For example, I have called this group “My keys”. Under this group, I have created new actions for Volume Up and Volume Down. Action type for both ones was set to “Keyboard Shortcut -> Command/URL (simple)” on the General tab. Then I've set up a key binding on the Shortcut tab. And, finally, on the Command/URL Settings tab, I have provided full path to a required script, e.g., /home/sergei/bin/vol_up.

When changes are applied, you may test your keys, for example, with alsamixer which should display different volume levels when you press appropriate buttons.


Xmodmap options are described, for example, here: http://docs.hp.com/en/B1171-90076/ch09s03.html



4.3 2D Acceleration


All three SuSE Linux distro versions provide good level of 2D-hardware acceleration on nc4000 notebook with standard radeon driver. Video chip in this machine is some sort of ATI Radeon IGP 340M. It is onboard one that uses shared memory; video RAM amount is set up via BIOS and can be equal to either 32 or 64 megabytes. For some strange reason, Windows XP is detecting this chip as ATI Radeon IGP 350M. :)


On SuSE 9.0, an issue was encountered with text-mode console on Linux (no framebuffer). In case when I close the notebook lid at initial boot-up time, I am not able to switch to text mode after boot-up is complete and the lid is open again (just blank screen is visible in this case). This can be cured by pressing a small plastic spike that is used to check if lid is open, or not (please examine the top left corner of the keyboard). Just press and release it carefully, and the screen should become alive again. :)


Note. Original ATI drivers for Radeon chips do not include support for IGP 340M on Linux at all, at the moment. “Just do nothing and save a few megabytes of download traffic at www.ati.com”. :)



4.4 3D Acceleration


Radeon IGP 340M chip capabilities are almost dead for “modern 3D gaming”. I've checked that on Windows XP. I cannot understand why an option for at least 8 or 16 megabytes of video RAM is not available in BIOS setup. In my opinion, this would be handy for machines with only 256 megabytes of RAM. Anyway, you may still play popular old games like Quake 2 or Tux Racer (including newer Planet Penguin Racer) “out of the box” but only on SuSE 9.2. Versions 9.0 and 9.1 do not include hardware 3D support by default, and you have to add it manually by installing recent X.org RPM package built by SuSE, for your distro. However, I have not tested this personally, so treat 3D support on these versions as a theory. I can only say that 3D is for sure supported on X.org v. 6.8.1 that comes with SuSE Linux version 9.2.



4.5 Dualhead


It seems that dualhead support for IGP chips is not included into SuSE Linux. At least out-of-the-box versions of SaX2 are telling me that dualhead configuration cannot be enabled for my chip. On Windows XP, this one is working.



4.6 TV Output


I haven't tried this on Linux at all. However, it does work on Windows XP. Please note that TV-Out of this notebook may be sensitive to the quality of the video cable. In particular, it refused to work with some sort of S-Video-to-SCART adaptor that I currently have: video card simply didn't “see” a TV set with it. However, pure S-Video cable seems to work OK.



4.7 External VGA Output


This one is working quite OK, without additional configuration. However, on SuSE 9.0 and 9.1 I had no overlay support for an external monitor. It means that when you're going to watch a movie with mplayer on your large-screen LCD or CRT, you have to use the -vo x11 option on command line, otherwise, player's window will remain black and blank. On SuSE 9.2, there is no such an issue and everything is OK.



4.8 Sound


Sound in nc4000 is ALI5451 (the snd-ali5451 kernel module), and it was recognized by ALSA drivers out of the box on all three versions of SuSE Linux. Pleasant thing is that one can control speaker and headphones volume values separately (I am using standard alsamixer application). Another pleasant bonus is an ability to play sound from several applications at once without artsd or esd running. Just disable these useless things and save your sanity. :) I have held successful experiments with mplayer+xmms and then xmms+mpg123 playing at the same time. I haven't tried sound input (i.e. microphone), though.



4.9 CardBus Slot


This one uses the yenta_socket kernel module. I have tested CardBus slot operation with CompactFlash and 4-Port USB 2.0 adaptors.



4.10 USB 2.0 Ports


USB ports were recognized correctly; they seem to work at a full speed. I have connected the following devices for test purposes: USB 1.1 6-in-1 Card Reader, Plextor USB CD-RW drive, Chesen USB keyboard (it was labelled as D-Computer), Logitech Pilot wireless optical mouse, and Genesys USB boxes for CD and hard drives. I had some problems with a hard drive that was put in such an USB box on SuSE 9.0, and with Lite-On LDW-851 DVD+/-RW drive on SuSE 9.2 (please see an appropriate section for details).



4.11 SD Slot


I have tried this one only on SuSE 9.2 when I've got a chance to play with a Secure Digital card. I've plugged the card in, and... nothing has happened. :) I haven't tried to read SD cards on Windows XP, though.



4.12 Wired Gigabit Networking


Gigabit network chip in this notebook is BroadCom BCM5705M (the bcm5700 kernel module on SuSE 9.0, the tg3 module on SuSE 9.1 and 9.2). Unfortunately, I have no gigabit networks around, only 10/100 ones. With SURECOM EP-805X 5-port switch, I was able to get a transfer speed of some 5MB/s when copying files over Samba (CIFS), in 100 Mbit mode.



4.13 Wireless Networking


Wireless mini-PCI card in this notebook is built with Atheros AR5212 chip; it supports connection speeds of up to 54 Mbit/s in full-duplex mode (the so-called “marketing” 108 Mbit/s). Under Linux, it works out of the box, with ath_pci kernel module.


With SuSE 9.0, I have used some access point from D-Link. Connection speed was 54 Mbit/s. However, when I have tried copying over Samba and FTP, I've got a speed of some 2,4...2,8 Mb/s both on Windows XP and Linux. Please note that when another notebook was connected to the same access point, download speed reduced to some 1,2...1,4 Mb/s.


SuSE 9.1 was not tested but I see no reason why it should not work with AR5212 chip.


With SuSE 9.2, another access point was used (MicroStar AP54G), and two other notebooks on the same network were present. Transfer speed was less than 1Mb/s (some 24 Mbit/s connection or so). It has made running programs from another computer using the ssh -X a bit unpleasant. However, for Web surfing such a low speed is more than acceptable.



4.14 Bluetooth


Haven't tried this on Linux. It seems to work under Windows XP, though (an Internet access over the mobile phone was tested).



4.15 Built-in Modem


There is a “software” modem in this notebook, called MC5457 AC-Link Modem, and it seems to be detected out of the box.


However, when I've tried to dial an ISP on SuSE 9.0, there was no success. I suspect it was because of the fact that early versions of this driver do not support pulse dialing at all (and tone dialing is not available in my location). So I finally went to www.smlink.com (that is SmartLink Ltd.) and get their latest unstable (unsupported) drivers. They are quite OK, however, with some limitations.


On SuSE 9.1, I have installed those unsupported drivers, too.


SuSE 9.2 already includes quite recent version of drivers, so I haven't downloaded anything.


As I've already said, the drivers have an acceptable quality but feature some issues that can be easily avoided:




4.16 IRDA Port


Haven't tested this on Linux. On Windows it worked OK with some Siemens mobile phone.



4.17 APM


I have installed notebook tools that are coming with KDE, so I am able to see battery level. The appropriate system tray applet provides controls for Standby and Suspend as well. On SuSE 9.0, standby mode is working OK; suspend mode is screwing up machine. Please note that if you do need those modes to be accessible from tray applet, you should do setuid root for /usr/bin/apm first.


I haven't tried any kind of suspend on SuSE 9.1.


On SuSE 9.2, pressing the Suspend to RAM button (Fn+F3) seems to be working. But for some strange reason, cupsd is eating a lot of CPU power after wake-up. So I would recommend to stop CUPS before suspending.


Suspend to disk was not tested at all.


Automatic change of CPU clock (frequency scaling) is working in all versions of SuSE Linux; versions 9.0 and 9.1 are using cpufreqd, version 9.2 is using powersaved for this purpose.


With APM and frequency scaling, I was able to work (not play) for a minimum period of two hours. The highest result was about 2:35 on a standard battery. Sure, I have played with LCD backlight in order to achieve better results. :)



4.18 ACPI


On SuSE 9.0 and 9.1, I was not able to see battery charge level in a KDE tray applet; however, fan speed and CPU clock changes were OK.


On SuSE 9.2, I had to stop using ACPI and go back to APM, although tray applet was updated and battery charge level was displayed OK. The problem was in the fact that time after time kacpid consumed too much CPU power. This resulted into noticeable delays even when I was typing text to say nothing about playing Tux Racer. In the latter case, slowdowns were inacceptable, and the game did not run smoothly.



4.19 USB Hard Drive


For USB hard drives, I would recommend the use of FAT32 file system. With ext3, you may probably experience noticeable slowdown when saving files to a hard drive (in my tests, the score was 3:1, with FAT32 as a winner ;)). This may be due to the fact that journal is used on ext3. One more thing here is compatibility: FAT32 is readable by Windows and Mac OS X as well.


I have used hard drives from Seagate, Samsung, and Maxtor in USB boxes from Genesys. It seems that these USB boxes are not working being connected via USB hubs. They require a regular USB port to work. So I have bought a CardBus adaptor with four USB 2.0 ports to resolve two problems at once (the second problem was insufficient amount of built-in USB ports in a notebook).


USB drive is visible as SCSI device /dev/sda, with partitions (/dev/sda1, etc.) on it.


nc4000:~ # fdisk -l /dev/sda


Disk /dev/sda: 200.0 GB, 200049647616 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24321 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes


Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sda1 1 12158 97659103+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)

/dev/sda2 12159 24321 97699297+ c W95 FAT32 (LBA)


On SuSE 9.0, the use of USB hard drive was practically not possible. Writing data was OK but I've got a problem with reading it back. :( In other words, I could only read directory listing and small files. MPlayer just screwed up when I've tried to play a 700-MB AVI file from an USB hard drive.


On SuSE 9.1, situation was better. However, I've got read/write errors time after time.


With version 9.2, this stuff is finally working quite well. One real problem is hwscan that is used to detect USB devices. It consumes too much CPU time when setting up newly-inserted device. (Due to this fact you may possibly wish to disable automatic mounting via subfs). However, once a device is set up, it calms down and everything is OK. Files on USB drive are accessible under /media/ directory.


An article below describes how to disable subfs on SuSE 9.1. It is almost OK for version 9.2 but please note that /etc/sysconfig/hotplug file here has other parameters (HOTPLUG_MOUNT_TYPE and HOTPLUG_DO_MOUNT) in order to make subfs usage more flexible:


http://portal.suse.com/sdb/en/2004/05/hmeyer_91_revert_from_subfs.html



4.20 USB DVD+/-RW Drive


I am using usual desktop Lite-On LDW-851S drive connected via Genesys USB box.


It was OK under SuSE 9.0 and 9.1. I was able to burn discs with k3b as well as from command line.


On SuSE 9.2, for some reason, things are a bit problematic: k3b is loosing an USB drive time after time. Another unpleasant issue was DVD+R recording: I've spoiled three discs, they are not readable either from Linux or Windows, however, no errors were reported at the time of recording! Please note that DVD+RW and CD-R/RW recording is not a problem.


Now to the Audio CD grabbing. If it fails to work, please set up appropriate permissions for /dev/sr* and /dev/sg* devices in order to make them available to all users but not just root.



4.21 USB Keyboard


This one is working OK on SuSE 9.2. The only thing that is worth mentioning is that you need to connect keyboard to a built-in USB port since ports of CardBus USB Adaptor are “invisible” until drivers are loaded. My keyboard's brand is D-Computer; Linux detects it as Chesen USB Keyboard. It is simple black keyboard without any multimedia keys.



4.22 USB Mouse


I am using Logitech Pilot wireless optical mouse. It is correctly detected at install time. If you're adding an USB mouse later, you would probably have to edit your /etc/X11/XF86Config file (aka /etc/X11/xorg.conf on SuSE 9.2). First, a new Mouse section should be introduced (for SuSE 9.0, it is better to use /dev/usbmouse0 as a mouse device):


Section "InputDevice"

Identifier "Mouse[2]"

Driver "mouse"

Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice"

Option "SendCoreEvents" "true"

Option "Protocol" "IMPS/2"

Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"

Option "Buttons" "5"

EndSection


And then it is required to add a new pointer device to Server Layout:


Section "ServerLayout"

Identifier "Layout[all]"

InputDevice "Keyboard[0]" "CoreKeyboard"

InputDevice "Mouse[1]" "CorePointer"

InputDevice "Mouse[2]"

Option "Clone" "off"

Option "Xinerama" "off"

Screen "Screen[0]"

EndSection


Do not forget about AllowMouseOpenFail option (this one is required to be enabled in case when you use USB mouse time after time):


Section "ServerFlags"

Option "AllowMouseOpenFail"

Option "RandR" "on"

EndSection



4.23 USB Printer


I am using Samsung ML-1710P USB/LPT printer. If your distro is missing an appropriate ppd file, you may get it at http://linuxprinting.org. Please note that SuSE uses samsunggdi device name for this printer, instead of just gdi. So you have to edit ppd file from LinuxPrinting manually, and replace “gdi” with “samsunggdi” where required. SuSE 9.2 already includes correct ppd file. Another thing that you may probably want to adjust in this file is Imageable Area for different paper sizes (this setting affects margins). For A4-sized paper, I am using this one:


*DefaultImageableArea: A4

*ImageableArea A4/A4: "24 48 571 818"



4.24 USB Card Reader


I am using 6-in-1 USB 1.1 Card Reader from Alcor Micro. It is represented as a set of SCSI devices like /dev/sda1, /dev/sdb1, etc. on SuSE 9.0 and 9.1. On SuSE 9.2, it is mounted automatically under /media/ directory by default.



4.25 USB 2.0 4-Port Hub


I have bought a “noname” hub in order to increase amount of USB ports in the system. This hub is working OK for keyboard and mouse. However, USB boxes refused to work with it. I suppose it is a pure hardware issue.



4.26 CardBus CompactFlash Adaptor


I have bought CardBus CF Adaptor from Pretec. It is working fine under SuSE Linux 9.0 and 9.1. It is visible as /dev/hde in the system, so I had to add a single line into my /etc/fstab file in order to make it work:


/dev/hde1 /media/pccard vfat noauto,user,iocharset=cp1251,codepage=866,umask=0,quiet,gid=100 0 0


(Please note that another codepages may be used in your country!)


SuSE 9.2 is a different story. It detects adaptor automatically and then tries to mount it on its own. With CompactFlash card formatted in a digital camera, this may fail causing a lot of error messages on 10th console and high CPU load. For such cases, I would recommend to avoid usage of subfs and mount devices manually, just like in version 9.0. As I've mentioned above, there's a good article on the net about disabling subfs:


http://portal.suse.com/sdb/en/2004/05/hmeyer_91_revert_from_subfs.html


Please just note that SuSE 9.2 uses another parameters for hotplug/subfs control, HOTPLUG_MOUNT_TYPE, and HOTPLUG_DO_MOUNT.



4.27 USB 2.0 4-port CardBus Adaptor


I have tested a “noname” USB 2.0 4-port CardBus (PCCard) adaptor. It is built with NEC chip; everything is OK with it under three versions of SuSE Linux (9.0, 9.1, and 9.2).


Below are the URLs to some photos of this device:


http://yourdesktop.org/filez/tmp/in-package.jpg

http://yourdesktop.org/filez/tmp/out-of-slot.jpg

http://yourdesktop.org/filez/tmp/in-slot.jpg



4.28 Digital Camera


I have tested Canon Digital IXUS 400 camera. It uses PTP in order to transfer pictures over USB, so it is not possible to mount it as an USB storage. For such cameras, you may use gphoto2 and digikam. However, under SuSE 9.2, digikam was working correctly with this camera only for the first time. Later, camera was not discovered at all. Due to this fact, I would recommend to use some sort of USB Card Reader or CardBus CF/SD/... Adaptor as a companion to PTP-class digital cameras. Use of adaptors may save battery and your time on charging it as well.



4.29 Printer Server


I have tested Surecom EP-901XU printer server. It has one USB 1.1 port. Samsung ML-1710P laser printer was connected to it. Initial setup of IP address for the server was done under Windows 2000. Under Linux, I have set it up as a remote LPD server, with queue name set to lp1. Please do not forget to enable local filtering as well since printer server has no printer drivers on it. I have used YaST2 to set these things up.



Miscellaneous


`lspci` output on SuSE 9.0 Distro


sergei@nc4000:~> su -c "lspci -n"

Password:

00:00.0 Class 0600: 1002:cbb2 (rev 02)

00:01.0 Class 0604: 1002:7010

00:06.0 Class 0401: 10b9:5451 (rev 02)

00:07.0 Class 0601: 10b9:1533

00:08.0 Class 0703: 10b9:5457

00:09.0 Class 0200: 168c:0013 (rev 01)

00:0b.0 Class 0607: 1217:7114 (rev 20)

00:0b.1 Class 0607: 1217:7114 (rev 20)

00:0b.2 Class 0880: 1217:7110

00:10.0 Class 0101: 10b9:5229 (rev c4)

00:11.0 Class 0680: 10b9:7101

00:12.0 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

00:12.1 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

00:12.2 Class 0c03: 1033:00e0 (rev 04)

00:13.0 Class 0200: 14e4:165d (rev 01)

01:05.0 Class 0300: 1002:4337


sergei@nc4000:~> su -c "lspci -v"

Password:

00:00.0 Host bridge: ATI Technologies Inc: Unknown device cbb2 (rev 02)

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 66

Memory at 9c000000 (32-bit, prefetchable) [size=64M]

Memory at 98500000 (32-bit, prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [a0] AGP version 2.0


00:01.0 PCI bridge: ATI Technologies Inc PCI Bridge [IGP 340M] (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 99

Bus: primary=00, secondary=01, subordinate=01, sec-latency=66

I/O behind bridge: 00002000-00002fff

Memory behind bridge: 90000000-900fffff

Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 94000000-97ffffff


00:06.0 Multimedia audio controller: ALi Corporation M5451 PCI AC-Link Controller Audio Device (rev 02)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 11

I/O ports at 3000 [size=256]

Memory at 98100000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [dc] Power Management version 2


00:07.0 ISA bridge: ALi Corporation M1533 PCI to ISA Bridge [Aladdin IV]

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0

Capabilities: [a0] Power Management version 1


00:08.0 Modem: ALi Corporation Intel 537 [M5457 AC-Link Modem] (prog-if 00 [Generic])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

Memory at 98180000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

I/O ports at 3400 [size=256]

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


00:09.0 Ethernet controller: Unknown device 168c:0013 (rev 01)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 00e6

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 168, IRQ 5

Memory at 98080000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]

Capabilities: [44] Power Management version 2


00:0b.0 CardBus bridge: O2 Micro, Inc.: Unknown device 7114 (rev 20)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, slow devsel, latency 168, IRQ 11

Memory at 98200000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Bus: primary=00, secondary=02, subordinate=02, sec-latency=176

Memory window 0: 1e000000-1e3ff000 (prefetchable)

Memory window 1: 1e400000-1e7ff000

I/O window 0: 00004000-000040ff

I/O window 1: 00004400-000044ff

16-bit legacy interface ports at 0001


00:0b.1 CardBus bridge: O2 Micro, Inc.: Unknown device 7114 (rev 20)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, slow devsel, latency 168, IRQ 11

Memory at 98280000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Bus: primary=00, secondary=03, subordinate=03, sec-latency=176

Memory window 0: 1e800000-1ebff000 (prefetchable)

Memory window 1: 1ec00000-1efff000

I/O window 0: 00004800-000048ff

I/O window 1: 00004c00-00004cff

16-bit legacy interface ports at 0001


00:0b.2 System peripheral: O2 Micro, Inc.: Unknown device 7110

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: slow devsel, IRQ 11

Memory at 98300000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [a0] Power Management version 2


00:10.0 IDE interface: ALi Corporation M5229 IDE (rev c4) (prog-if ea)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

I/O ports at 3800 [size=16]

Capabilities: [60] Power Management version 2


00:11.0 Bridge: ALi Corporation M7101 PMU

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: medium devsel


00:12.0 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98380000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


00:12.1 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98400000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


00:12.2 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB 2.0 (rev 04) (prog-if 20 [EHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98480000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=256]

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


00:13.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5705M Gigabit Ethernet (rev 01)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98000000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]

Expansion ROM at <unassigned> [disabled] [size=64K]

Capabilities: [48] Power Management version 2

Capabilities: [50] Vital Product Data

Capabilities: [58] Message Signalled Interrupts: 64bit+ Queue=0/3 Enable-


01:05.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon IGP 340M (prog-if 00 [VGA])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

Memory at 94000000 (32-bit, prefetchable) [size=64M]

I/O ports at 2000 [size=256]

Memory at 90000000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]

Expansion ROM at <unassigned> [disabled] [size=128K]

Capabilities: [58] AGP version 2.0

Capabilities: [50] Power Management version 2



`lspci` output on SuSE 9.2 Distro


nc4000:~ # lspci -n

0000:00:00.0 Class 0600: 1002:cbb2 (rev 02)

0000:00:01.0 Class 0604: 1002:7010

0000:00:06.0 Class 0401: 10b9:5451 (rev 02)

0000:00:07.0 Class 0601: 10b9:1533

0000:00:08.0 Class 0703: 10b9:5457

0000:00:09.0 Class 0200: 168c:0013 (rev 01)

0000:00:0b.0 Class 0607: 1217:7114 (rev 20)

0000:00:0b.1 Class 0607: 1217:7114 (rev 20)

0000:00:0b.2 Class 0880: 1217:7110

0000:00:10.0 Class 0101: 10b9:5229 (rev c4)

0000:00:11.0 Class 0680: 10b9:7101

0000:00:12.0 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

0000:00:12.1 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

0000:00:12.2 Class 0c03: 1033:00e0 (rev 04)

0000:00:13.0 Class 0200: 14e4:165d (rev 01)

0000:01:05.0 Class 0300: 1002:4337

0000:02:00.0 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

0000:02:00.1 Class 0c03: 1033:0035 (rev 43)

0000:02:00.2 Class 0c03: 1033:00e0 (rev 04)


nc4000:~ # lspci -v

0000:00:00.0 Host bridge: ATI Technologies Inc RS200/RS200M AGP Bridge [IGP340M] (rev 02)

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 66

Memory at 9c000000 (32-bit, prefetchable)

Memory at 98500000 (32-bit, prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [a0] AGP version 2.0


0000:00:01.0 PCI bridge: ATI Technologies Inc PCI Bridge [IGP 340M] (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 99

Bus: primary=00, secondary=01, subordinate=01, sec-latency=66

I/O behind bridge: 00002000-00002fff

Memory behind bridge: 90000000-900fffff

Prefetchable memory behind bridge: 94000000-97ffffff

Expansion ROM at 00002000 [disabled] [size=4K]


0000:00:06.0 Multimedia audio controller: ALi Corporation M5451 PCI AC-LinkController Audio Device (rev 02)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 11

I/O ports at 3000

Memory at 98100000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=4K]

Capabilities: [dc] Power Management version 2


0000:00:07.0 ISA bridge: ALi Corporation M1533 PCI to ISA Bridge [Aladdin IV]

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0

Capabilities: [a0] Power Management version 1


0000:00:08.0 Modem: ALi Corporation M5457 AC'97 Modem Controller (prog-if 00 [Generic])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

Memory at 98180000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

I/O ports at 3400 [size=256]

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:00:09.0 Ethernet controller: Atheros Communications, Inc. AR5212 802.11abg NIC (rev 01)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 00e6

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 168, IRQ 5

Memory at 98080000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [44] Power Management version 2


0000:00:0b.0 CardBus bridge: O2 Micro, Inc. OZ711M1 SmartCardBus MultiMediaBay Controller (rev 20)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, slow devsel, latency 168, IRQ 11

Memory at 98200000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Bus: primary=00, secondary=02, subordinate=05, sec-latency=176

Memory window 0: 1e000000-1e3ff000 (prefetchable)

Memory window 1: 1e400000-1e7ff000

I/O window 0: 00004000-000040ff

I/O window 1: 00004400-000044ff

16-bit legacy interface ports at 0001


0000:00:0b.1 CardBus bridge: O2 Micro, Inc. OZ711M1 SmartCardBus MultiMediaBay Controller (rev 20)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, slow devsel, latency 168, IRQ 11

Memory at 98280000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Bus: primary=00, secondary=06, subordinate=09, sec-latency=176

Memory window 0: 1e800000-1ebff000 (prefetchable)

Memory window 1: 1ec00000-1efff000

I/O window 0: 00004800-000048ff

I/O window 1: 00004c00-00004cff

16-bit legacy interface ports at 0001


0000:00:0b.2 System peripheral: O2 Micro, Inc. OZ711Mx MultiMediaBay Accelerator

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: slow devsel, IRQ 11

Memory at 98300000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [a0] Power Management version 2


0000:00:10.0 IDE interface: ALi Corporation M5229 IDE (rev c4) (prog-if ea)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

I/O ports at 3800 [size=16]

Capabilities: [60] Power Management version 2


0000:00:11.0 Bridge: ALi Corporation M7101 Power Management Controller [PMU]

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: medium devsel


0000:00:12.0 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98380000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:00:12.1 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98400000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:00:12.2 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB 2.0 (rev 04) (prog-if 20 [EHCI])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98480000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:00:13.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5705M Gigabit Ethernet (rev 01)

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 10

Memory at 98000000 (64-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [48] Power Management version 2

Capabilities: [50] Vital Product Data

Capabilities: [58] Message Signalled Interrupts: 64bit+ Queue=0/3 Enable-


0000:01:05.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon IGP 340M (prog-if 00 [VGA])

Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation: Unknown device 005a

Flags: bus master, stepping, 66Mhz, medium devsel, latency 66, IRQ 11

Memory at 94000000 (32-bit, prefetchable)

I/O ports at 2000 [size=256]

Memory at 90000000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable) [size=64K]

Capabilities: [58] AGP version 2.0

Capabilities: [50] Power Management version 2


0000:02:00.0 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Unknown device 2027:0035

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 11

Memory at 1e400000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:02:00.1 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])

Subsystem: Unknown device 2027:0035

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 11

Memory at 1e401000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


0000:02:00.2 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB 2.0 (rev 04) (prog-if 20 [EHCI])

Subsystem: Unknown device 2027:0032

Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 68, IRQ 11

Memory at 1e402000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

Capabilities: [40] Power Management version 2


Note. Extra USB controller entries are due to the fact that a CardBus USB 2.0 adaptor was connected to a notebook.






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